Your presentation design matters more than you think

….. So give the design the attention it deserves!

I have been speaking/presenting at events around Europe for a few years now and have learned a lot about the art of speaking: Repeating questions back to the audience, surpressing “um” and “err” sounds, making eye contact with the audience etc. These are all well communicated best-practices across all industries when it comes to presenting information to both small and large audiences.

Something that is less written and talked about is the style or design of the supporting content.

Many people think of a presentation and the dreaded

  • Death
  • by
  • Bulletpoint
  • presentation

We’ve all been in one of those presentations before, unfortunately this happens more often than it should. The most regular (ab)users of this presentation method are our bosses/managers, who may be great managers but can be the worst presenters out there! Basically throwing up walls of text in PowerPoint and reading the words back to the audience.

After initially falling into this trap (though not quite as text-book fail as just outlined), I have tried to change my presentation style to engage the audience more and use PowerPoint for what it should be used; a support tool for the ideas I am trying to communicate, rather than a display for the content itself. The idea being, the viewer should see the slide and listen to me speaking and merge the two sources of input into their own understanding of the topic. When the audience member reviews the slides at a later date, they should be able to recall the topic and their ideas and continue to benefit from the session.

While trying out these ideas, I have searched online for inspiration and spoke with friends/colleagues about how they approach their presentations. This included some great discussions with Boris Hristov ( b | t ) and Cathrine Wilhelmsen ( b | t ) at the SQLKonferenz 2015 in Darmstadt, Germany. They gave me some ideas to help simplify my slide content and generally improve my presentations and make them more useful for the audience.

After these discussions, Boris obviously saw an opportunity to explore the area of presentation design as a service (I claim the trademark on PDaaS!). If you have ever seen Boris present, you will agree with me that Boris is the perfect person to tackle this idea. His presentations are so clear and to the point, that it seems obvious that he should offer his skills to people and companies that want to stand out from the crowd when presenting. He has proved this with his excellent Pluralsight course on the topic of presentation design.

Boris’ new venture is called 356labs and is focused purely on designing top-notch presentations and training people in presentation design, so that they can produce their own high quality content. Go and take a look at the portfolio page and you will see what I’m talking about. Boris has an eye for presentation design, which takes some complex topics and provides simplistic supporting slides that allow the viewer to concentrate on the topic at hand. So if you are looking for mentoring or training on presentation skills, be sure that 356labs with its top rated international speakers will be able to help you out.

I’m looking forward to what Boris has in store with 356labs and am sure that a lot of people will benefit from the service and advice he has to offer.

Good luck Boris!

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